FREDERIC BELAUBRE

“Ostinato” — Bill Clark

71. Barque,-29×42-cm
All art featured in this interview © Frederic Belaubre
— Please do not copy art from this website —

7. Oil-on-Canvas-116-x-89-cm

E-Interview by: WINNIE LUK

E-Interview by:
WINNIE LUK
(continued from Welcome Page)

3...What is the greatest aspect of working as an artist?

Frédéric: The freedom. The pleasure to achieve a satisfactory result, by high standards.

Frederic Belaubre

4...As an artist, what does “success” mean to you? “Creativity”?

Frédéric: Success depends on so many random factors . . . I have the ambition to succeed with my painting at the time of working on it. Social success, if it arrives before the accomplishment of a deeper self, disrupts the path. It paralyses the possibilities, aspiring (relegating) an artist to repetition.

When the creativity is not in tune with the development, it slows the interior maturing of the being, it (then becomes) just a money game.

5...From where do you draw inspiration? Is there a place you go to feel inspired? Who are some other artists, past or present, that you admire?

Frédéric: My main source of inspiration lies in the work itself. Sometimes the images, generated by those already painted, come to me while walking. At the present time they are in me constantly, I live with a small inner museum of my works to come.

I admire all the painters, all the artists, who manage to create a truly personal work.

  • 47. Vignette-florale,-41x31-cm

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58. Acrylic-on-Paper-32-x-24-cm

6...How would you describe your style? How has your style evolved over time?

Frédéric: A kind of abstract expressionism in a search for lightness and transparency.

I’ve always practiced abstraction alongside the figurative work with a model, considering the reality as a source of a primary emotion. The more abstract my paintings become, the closer I feel to the emotion given to me by the real.

7...What are some of your favorite pieces, and why? Which is your most personal piece?

Frédéric: My latest paintings are what I naturally consider the closest to my actual sentiments. The next ones, that live in my head, will be even closer to me. It seems to me that what I am and what I am starting to be able to do, become more and more one and the same thing.

83. Acrylic-on-Paper-59,4-x-42-cm

8...What has been one of the most difficult aspects of working as an artist? What advice do you have for people experiencing similar difficulties?

Frédéric: For me one of the most difficult aspects has been to know what I am, to get rid of all the invasive and contradictory superego. To know what I want based on what I am, at the same time leaving a free field for the development of the being. Then to learn how to accomplish it technically.

Advice? Try to have enough self-confidence and aim to find in the depths of oneself what is unique that deserves to be painted, and that has never been done before by somebody else.

9...What is the greatest aspect of working as an artist?

Frédéric: The freedom. The pleasure to achieve a satisfactory result, by high standards.

10...Where do you see the field heading in the next 10 years?

Frédéric: No idea. I am not concerned about that.

136. Modesty-41-x-29-cm

Connect with Frederic at
fredericbelaubre.com

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TIFFANIE MANG

Tiffanie Mang – © – November 2016


Tiffanie Mang is originally from San Diego, California. She is a graduate of USC with a major in Animation and Digital Arts. Current creative projects include working as Art Director and artist on Thralled, an award winning interactive experience coming soon on Mac, PC and Ouya — and an inspired stint working with Breakthru Films.

Sunrise While Walking to Work

© Tiffanie Mang

© Tiffanie Mang

Tiffanie Mang loves to paint, create, travel, and eat. As we explored her colorful portfolio it was evident why Breakthru Films chose her work for their visually stunning project “Loving Vincent.”

E-Interview by: WINNIE LUK

E-Interview by:
WINNIE LUK

1...From where do you draw inspiration? Is there a place you go to feel inspired? Who are some other artists, past or present, that you admire?,

Tiffanie: I definitely draw inspiration from nature and architecture for my illustrations and plein air. I am always observing my surroundings, and often times when I get excited about certain lighting and colors at different times of a day, I build my story for an illustration around that. There is no set place I go to get inspired — I am always trying to find inspiration wherever I go.

There are so many artists who I admire and look up to. I love Sargeant, Sorolla, Schmidt, Monet, Turner, and Degas just to name a few. Contemporary artists that I look up to in animation and fine art are Pascal Campion, Mike Hernandez, Chris Appelhans, Tadahiro, Uesugi, Christophe Lautrette, Chien Chung Wei, Joseph Todorovitch, and Jeremy Lipking, Of course many more as well!

  • Newport Beach, Afternoon

2. What is the greatest aspect of working as an artist?

You can create art ALL the time! There is no greater fun than that.

3. What are you trying to communicate through your art?

© Tiffanie Mang

© Tiffanie Mang

I am always trying to tell a story that everyone can relate to in my art. If it is an illustration, I try to capture sweet, charming, or sentimental moments that I observed or felt, and create one image that tells a story with the composition, color, and lighting. With my plein airs, I always try to capture the atmosphere and lighting of the landscape in the brush strokes and color palette; I never try and replicate the colors that I see, but more like the colors I felt while observing the landscape and soaking in its beauty. I always try and experiment with different color harmonies to make colors vibrant against and sing with each other.

© Tiffanie Mang

© Tiffanie Mang

4. As an artist, what does “success” mean to you? “Creativity”?

Success to me is an ever-changing goal that I am always trying to reach as an artist. I believe that to be a successful artist, you should never consider yourself completely successful, but should always strive to push for something more. To attain success, I must push myself all the time to go out of my comfort zone. It does not necessarily mean just being “creative” when designing, but it is when I feel like I have put my soul and identity in the piece and have been true to the original concept I first brainstormed. When the emotion and message I am trying to convey is adherent in the brush strokes and color, that’s when I consider a piece a success.

5. What was it that made you decide to pursue art as a career?

I had been going to art classes since I was 6, so art was always in my life. However, I wasn’t sure I want to try and pursue art and animation as my career until I watched Avatar by Spielberg and was amazed at the visual effects of the film. While studying animation at the University of Southern California, I slowly discovered that my passion in the film industry was working as a visual development artist and brainstorming conceptual ideas during the early stages of creating a film.

During these last couple of years, I have gotten the privilege to study under various mentors who have helped me discover my passion for plein air painting and illustration even more. Now, I am currently working as a painter and animator on the film Loving Vincent with Breakthru films, where we are making the first fully hand painted feature film about the life of Van Gogh.

6. How would you describe your style? How has your style evolved over time?

© Tiffanie Mang

© Tiffanie Mang

I would describe my style as very loose, free, emotional, and organic. I used to love very detailed, intricate paintings but now I and attracted to pieces that carry the impression or essence of the subject. I am always inspired by color and light- I am constantly observing my surroundings and noticing how people interact, how the light is affecting the atmosphere, etc. My style is constantly evolving even though I don’t always notice it- I think as I technically improve in painting, I unexpectedly discover new fresh ways to put down brush strokes and experiment with different color palettes.

7. What are some of your favorite pieces, and why? Which is your most personal piece?

My favorite pieces are probably the ones that I resonated most with at the time I saw my inspiration. They are the ones that are not necessarily the most detailed or took longer to create- sometimes pieces that I whip out in an hour or two are the ones that I consider most successful. My favorite digital piece up to date is titled “An Artist’s’ Thoughts” (see slideshow below). It shows a girl sitting by a large window, notebook by her on the couch, gazing out through the rainy glass. I painted this one at a more darker time in my life, when I wasn’t sure what to do next and felt confused, but I felt something good was going to happen in the near future- I didn’t know what and when. I painted it spontaneously at a coffee shop, and was surprised at how many people connected with it, even though it wasn’t the most technically well executed piece.

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  • Coffee Shop

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8. What has been one of the most difficult aspects of working as an artist? What advice do you have for people experiencing similar difficulties?

Art is always difficult, and that is the beauty of it. The challenges one faces constantly trying to find his or her voice is what helps one grow stronger and squeeze the creativity juices. For me, one of the most difficult aspects is trying to find my personal style in my art after learning from so many amazing artists. Sometimes, my mind can be cramped when I like someone’s work too much, and I end up trying too hard to “copy” his or her style. In the end, the illustration turns out awful and I have spent more time trying to just be a replica of someone else. I have learned how valuable it is to take tips from people and soak in aspects of their work that I like, and then mold it into my own unique style.

In the working field, sometimes you cannot always paint in your style when the client is looking for something else. As an artist, one has to be flexible and adapt to many different styles. The more styles you can paint in, the more likely you are to be hired at different companies.

Trailer for Thralled — an interactive experience that takes place in 1700’s Brazil and seeks to take the player on an allegorical and surreal journey of a runaway slave, Isaura, who searches for her baby son that was taken away from her.

9. Where do you see yourself heading in the next 10 years?

That is a tricky question — right now I want to do so many things that I actually can’t quite decide. But I do know for sure that I want to work in the animation field for a bit more, teach classes in plein air painting, and eventually establish my own studio where I can create and art direct my own short or feature film.

Connect with Tiffanie at
TiffanieMange.Squarespace.com
Instagram
Facebook

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CASSANDRA TONDRO

  • Art © Cassandra Tondro
E-Interview by: WINNIE LUK

E-Interview by:
WINNIE LUK

1...What was it that made you decide to pursue art as a career?

It has always been my dream to be a professional artist, but I didn’t start out there! As a young adult I didn’t have the confidence that I would be able to earn a living from sales of my art, so I went into computer programming instead. After 18 years of that I opened a retail fiber art supply store, which was one step closer to my dream. Then I sold the store and took the plunge into being a full-time artist.

cassandra-tondro

2. How would you describe your style? How has your style evolved over time?

"Heartfeather," original abstract 36" x 12"

“Heartfeather,”
original abstract
36″ x 12″

My style is called “process painting” — I respond to the materials in the moment. When I start a painting, I have a general idea of what I want to do, but my methods don’t allow me to have complete control over the outcome. I enjoy the spontaneity of seeing what happens, and working with the results. I have always preferred abstract painting, and have used different methods of applying the paint over the years, including pouring, dripping, splattering, pulling and pressing it onto canvas. I work with an unusual material — leftover house paint — that has some unique properties.

3. From where do you draw inspiration? Is there a place you go to feel inspired? Who are some other artists, past or present, that you admire?

"Eucalyptus" leaf print on watercolor paper 10" x 8"

“Eucalyptus” leaf print
on watercolor paper
10″ x 8″

I draw my inspiration from the materials that I use and from nature. Sometimes my materials are nature, such as my leaf prints. My color schemes come from things I see in the natural world, as do many of my designs. I’m inspired by the way that the paint flows to create gorgeous patterns and the way the colors blend and separate. Other artists I admire are Gerhard Richter, Stanley Casselman, Ed Moses, Lee Mullican, and Jackson Pollock.

4. What has been one of the most difficult aspects of working as an artist? What advice do you have for people experiencing similar difficulties?

The most difficult aspect of working as an artist has been learning how to sell art. Successful artists used to be represented by galleries that sold their work for them. With the advent of the Internet, many galleries have gone out of business, and people now buy art directly from artists. Fortunately there are good books and online programs available that teach artists how to market and sell their own work.

Wearable Art

Wearable Art — Leaf Print Necklaces

5. What is the greatest aspect of working as an artist?

Having the freedom to be wildly creative every day! Part of my job is being visionary and coming up with brilliant new ideas, then I get to try them out. How fun is that?

cassandra-tondro-s4

6. What are you trying to communicate through your art?

Fun, spontaneity, happiness, joy, love. My intent is to create work that is both visually intriguing and uplifting — art that resonates with the deeper aspects of our souls.

CASSANDRA TONDRO
LIVING in the WOW!

www.tondro.com

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Photos Link to Slideshow Features

ZOMAGAZINE.COM | FEATURED ARTISTS | 1st — 3rd Quarters 2016

THERESA DURANT

Quarter II | April-June 2016

“Tossed by the Wind” — © Theresa Durant

JONATHAN SCOTT PAULSON

Quarter II | April-June 2016

“Mirror Lake in Yangshuo” — © Jonathan Scott Paulson

JAEDA DEWALT

Quarter I | January-March 2016

“The Empath” — © Jaeda Dewalt

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ZOMAGAZINE.COM | FEATURED ARTISTS | October — December 2015

JOHN WILHELM

“Silly Clone Academy — Auditorium”

SASZA BARISTOW

“Dublin Unknown — Broken Dreams – Chapter Closed”

OLUSEGUN ADEJUMO

It takes a while to see what this painting really is (at least for some of us – lol).

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ZOMAGAZINE.COM | FEATURED ARTISTS | July — September 2015

DUANE KIRBY JENSEN

“The secular communion of everyday people.”

© 2011 By Duane Kirby Jensen

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ZOMAGAZINE.COM | FEATURED ARTISTS | April — June 2015

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ZOMAGAZINE.COM | FEATURED ARTISTS | January — March 2015

FANTOMMST | Lisa Ridings

“Spider Glue and Dew”

Glowing Circle 2x

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